Folder Brown Bats and White Nosed Fungus

pdf BB10 Summary of Findings Bat Detections at Birge Nature preserve Birding Trail

Author: Scott Myers

Author Affiliation: LCWC

Journal: Unpublished Report

ABSTRACT: Echolocation signals were recently recorded in the Birge Nature Preserve to monitor local bat activity using a Wildlife Acoustics detection meter. Eight of nine bat species native to Michigan were identified using Kaleidoscope software to interpret recorded signals. The Silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans) signals were recorded most frequently, followed by Little Brown Bat (Myotis lucifugus) and the Eastern Red Bat (Lasiurus borealis). The number of signals recorded for a given species does not accurately reflect a specific number of individuals, but signal numbers can be interpreted to indicate the relative population density among species. Data generated during this project will be incorporated in the Les Cheneaux Watershed Council (LCWC) database that is being developed in an attempt to obtain a more accurate assessment of Les Cheneaux bat population densities.

pdf BB11 Summary of Findings Bat Detections at Mackinac Island School Grounds

Author: Scott Myers

Author Affiliation: LCWC

Journal: Unpublished Report

 

ABSTRACT: Echolocation signals were recently recorded at the Mackinac Island school grounds to monitor local bat activity using a Wildlife Acoustics detection meter. Seven of nine bat species native to Michigan were identified using Kaleidoscope software to interpret recorded signals. Some signals are difficult for the software to precisely identify, therefore the number of signals recorded is more a qualified than a quantified value. Software interpretations of bat calls during this monitoring period resulted in about 70% of the signals being from the Little Brown Bat (Myotis lucifugus) and 20% of the signals being from the Eastern red bat (Lasiurus borealis). Silver-haired bats (Lasionycteris noctivagans) accounted for about 3% of the detections.

pdf BB1_Little Brown Bats in Les Cheneaux

Little Brown Bats in Les Cheneaux

Author: Scott Myers

Author Affiliation: LCWC

Journal: Unpublished

Abstract: The Little Brown Bat (Myotis lucifugus ) is our most common Les Cheneaux bat species. Little Brown Bat populations have been declining drastically across the USA in recent years due, primarily, to a fungal infection known as White Nose Syndrome (WNS). An informal 2016 Watershed Council survey indicated, although LCI bat numbers were down, we do have a surviving population.

pdf BB2_BAT SURVEY PROJECT PROPOSAL - 2017

LCWC Bat Survey Project Proposal - 2017

close upofnosewithfungus t1

Author: Scott Myers

Author Affiliation: LCWC

Journal: Unpublished Proposal; 2017

Abstract: A survey of Little Brown bats in the Les Cheneaux area will be conducted by the Watershed Council in 2017 to estimate our local bat population. Little Brown bats are the most common bat species in the Islands. Local bat numbers have declined in recent years due, most likely, to a fungal disease called White Nose Syndrome. Volunteers are being recruited to estimate bat numbers throughout the summer and tallies in the fall will be compared to other bat densities around the State to determine if the relative health of our bat population has been affected by the White Nose Syndrome fungal disease. Results will be published on this website, and will include an estimation of the local bat population, population trends, and resident species population estimates. 

pdf BB3_LES CHENEAUX ISLANDS BAT OBSERVATION POINTS

Les Cheneaux Islands Bat Observation Points

pdf BB3_LES CHENEAUX ISLANDS BAT SIGHTINGS - 2016

Les Cheneaux Islands Bat Sightings - 2016

Image BB4_WHITE NOSE FUNGUS OCCURANCE MAP

North American White Nose Fungus Occurance Map

pdf BB5_Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Environment White-Nose Syndrome (WNS) Response Plan - 2010

Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Environment White-Nose Syndrome (WNS) Response Plan - 2010

Authors: Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Environment (DNRE) (gratefully acknowledges the work of Dave Redell and colleagues of the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources)

Author Affiliation: Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Environment (DNRE)

Journal: MDNR Website

Abstract: Conserving bats is important. Bats make up one-forth of the world's mammalian species. Because the complex and sometimes subtle ecological roles played by bats are only beginning to be understood, the long term ecological effects of bat mortality due to WNS remain to be seen.
However, experience to date suggests that as WNS continues to spread, entire species of bats could be lost or driven to the brink of extinction. In addition, fewer bats will likely mean increased numbers of insects, resulting in more insect damage to crops and forests, and potentially an increase in insect borne agri- and arbori-cultural disease outbreaks, with potentially increased use of pesticides.

pdf BB7_NFWF Factsheet: Bats for the Future Fund

NFWF  Factsheet: Bats for the Future Fund

Authors: Amanda Bassow

Author Affiliation: The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF)

Journal: NFWF Website

Abstract: The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) are launching the Bats for the Future (BFF) Fund, which will pool public and private dollars to promote survival of bats in North America. The BFF Fund will award grants annually to develop innovative tools to slow the spread of white-nose syndrome, and speed the recovery of surviving bat populations.

private dollars to promote survival of bats in North America. The BFF Fund will award grants annually to develop innovative tools to slow the spread of white-nose syndrome, and speed the recovery of surviving bat populations.

pdf BB8_A Northern Michigan Bat Doctor Fights for the Hibernacula's Future

BB8_A Northern Michigan Bat Doctor Fights for the Hibernacula's Future

A Northern Michigan Bat Doctor Fights for the Hibernacula's Future

Authors: Suzanne Van Dam

Author Affiliation: MyNorth

Journal: Traverse Magazine

Abstract: The Great Lakes have buffered Michigan's bats against a disastrous disease that's decimated populations up and down the East Coast. Writer Suzanne Van Dam ventures underground with Dr. Allen Kurta and his bat squad to learn what the future holds for our mysterious and misunderstood friends of the night.

pdf BB9 2018 October Update Bat Monitoring Project

Author: Scott Myers

Author Affiliation: LCWC

Journal: Unpublished Report

ABSTRACT: Monitoring of bat calls was discontinued for September and October of 2018.
The Wildlife Acoustics Echometer touch has proven a very useful tool this year. Several driving transect cruises were undertaken as well as a walking tour of Coryell Island during the June through August time period. The total number of echo-location calls detected exceeded 250. Cruising speed during the cruises was limited to 10 to 15 MPH. When a signal was detected, travel was halted to obtain a better signal to noise ratio. Six species of bats were identified by the EMT2 software during the 2018 monitoring period:
Eastern Red
Little Brown
Big Brown
Hoary
Indiana (endangered)
Silver Haired (most recorded)


The bat call recording .wav files obtained were sent to Michael Fishman of Environmental Resource Management for verification of species identification. Mr. Fishman reviewed the recordings free of charge. His assessment in brief is that we do not have Indiana bats in the areas surveyed but Little Browns instead. His assessment is attached in the appendix. Mr. Fishman is also of the opinion that the remaining species identifications are correct. He also made several recommendations for obtaining higher quality recordings in the future.
Wildlife Acoustics does not recommend the Echometer Touch2 for the monitoring of Indiana or Northern Long Ear bats. Meeting the new federal standards for the definitive identification of these two species requires a recommended Song Meter SM4BAT FS Full-Spectrum Ultrasonic Recorder (microphone not included). These units with microphone cost $1000+.